Why the US Is Headed into Its Fourth Turning

Another wonderful and insightful articles from Doug Casey- With an element of prophecy as to what the future holds.. An interesting read.

Gerard O’Donovan

International Man: The economic, political, social, and cultural situation seems to have become increasingly volatile in the United States and more broadly in the West. Is this a unique situation or part of a recurring historical cycle?

Authors William Strauss and Neil Howe introduced a popular theory in their book, The Fourth Turning, outlining the recurring generational cycles that have occurred throughout American history.

What are your thoughts?

Doug Casey: I read Strauss and Howe’s first book, Generations, when it came out back in 1992. I thought it was brilliant.

Let me start off by recommending both Generations and The Fourth Turning to everybody. Both books offer quite a scholarly, readable, and prescient view of the cyclicality of history. And offer a very plausible forecast for the 2020s.

History’s best seen as cyclical, rather than a straight-line progress to some preordained end the way both the Marxists and the Abrahamic religions see it. But then, Ecclesiastes has its famous quote that there’s nothing new under the sun.

Plato in the Republic talks about how the younger generation—and we’re talking fourth century BC—can’t stand up to the moral values of their forefathers.

Older people have always thought that the younger generation wouldn’t quite measure up. In recent American history, you’ll recall, the younger generation were the beatniks in the ’50s, the hippies in the ’60s, and the yuppies in the ’80s—so it’s a passing parade. Older people have a tendency to think the world is going downhill. Nothing new there. But there’s always a rebirth.

Niccolò Machiavelli, in his Florentine Histories, said:

Virtue gives birth to tranquility, tranquility to leisure, leisure to disorder, disorder to ruin… and similarly from ruin, order is born, from order virtue, from virtue, glory and good fortune.

The bottom line is that societies arise from poverty through moral strength—and that brings them prosperity. But that prosperity brings on arrogance, and the arrogance brings on laziness, which brings on weakness and moral decline. Then they’re reduced to a condition of slavery and poverty again. Change is the only constant—except in human nature.

As I look at the United States, it seems to me the peak of American culture was the time just before Teddy Roosevelt came into office. Teddy is certainly among the top five worst presidents. And there’s plenty of competition for that title.

He was the first real “progressive” president; he wanted the government actively involved in all areas of life.

Now, that’s not to say that Teddy Roosevelt wouldn’t have been a really great drinking pal, a wonderful guy to go camping with, a fun guy to have an intellectual conversation with. He had a lot of admirable personal values. But he was a nationalist, a statist, and a warmonger. That’s why I say he was a horrible president.

The long-term trend of US overseas imperialism started with the Spanish–American War and the building of an overseas American empire in Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Philippines, and Hawaii—followed by World War I.

The US has gone from being noninterventionist to now having many hundreds of bases around the world and trying to give orders to every other country in the world. That kind of arrogance always ends badly.

As a civilization—a culture—the US has been on an accelerating path downhill for about 120 years now. That’s true even while science and technology have greatly increased the general standard of living. It’s a mistake to conflate a higher standard of living with higher moral values—that’s what Machiavelli was talking about.

I question whether that trend will change—at least until we have a genuine crisis. Why not? Because a lot of the way a society acts comes from the way kids are brought up—the values that are inculcated in them when they’re young. And increasingly, kids are taught what I would call the wrong values.

Saint Ignatius said this in the 17th century, and Lenin repeated it in the 20th century. They both said that if you indoctrinate someone in his youth, chances are you’ve directed his worldview for the rest of his life.

Cultural Marxists are now totally in control of the US educational system, and have been for a couple of generations. That’s absolutely the case in the colleges and universities but also in the high schools and even in the grade schools. Kids are being taught to be socialists, ecowarriors, social justice warriors, and “woke” from an early age. It’s really serious.

And it’s not a cyclical phenomenon. This is one of the few areas in which I take some issue with The Fourth Turning. The trend towards collectivism and statism seems to be a secular long-term trend that’s still accelerating.

There are a few bright spots. Libertarians, for instance, are somewhat more prominent than in the past. But the fact that libertarians believe in personal freedom, in the face of a societal trend in the opposite direction, makes me tend to believe they’re actually genetic mutants. They’re just a small percentage of the population, whose nature has resisted the prevailing nurture.

I say that, only partially because of my own experience. I grew up in what could—jokingly—be called a cannibalistic death cult and was imbued with all kinds of strange notions by nuns and priests at the schools that I went to. I rejected them intuitively and intellectually, but they still stick to you like tar. It can take years to wash off the effects of early indoctrination.

I’m more of a maverick than most people are, however. Most just continue to believe what they’re taught as kids, reflexively and automatically—right or wrong. So I don’t think there’s really much hope of a serious change in the direction of American culture. At least until a major crisis—and the outcome of that is in doubt


International Man
: OK. That’s the long-term trend. Where are we in the generational cycle now? Are we moving into the fourth turning and headed for a crisis?

Doug Casey: Strauss and Howe take a cyclical point of view over the course of roughly 80 years, four generations.

To very briefly summarize their theory, there are four “turnings”: a “high,” an “awakening,” an “unraveling,” and a “crisis.”

Over the last couple of decades, we’ve been undergoing the unraveling, where old values fall apart. Next, Strauss and Howe predicted a crisis, starting about 2015, which tests the very existence of the society. Or at least the way it’s run.

They go beyond seeing generations as being simply “liberal” or “conservative.” According to Strauss and Howe, there are four generational archetypes that last over a cycle of 80 years—20 years per generation—corresponding to the “turnings.”

Without going into all the details, they see the baby boomers as being a “Prophet” Generation. The authors are ideologically oriented—fire and brimstone types—very much like Bernie Sanders on the left and Donald Trump on the right. Kind of biblically apocalyptic by nature.

They were quite correct in defining the Generation X types as the so-called “Nomad” Generation. These are kids who learned to take care of themselves—and are not so ideological in the way they think.

The Millennials are who are relevant at the moment. They correspond, in Strauss and Howe’s view, to the World War II generation. They’d be the frontline soldiers in the coming crisis and conflicts.

International Man: What happens after a crisis? Is there a positive way forward?

Doug Casey: Historically, the answer is, “Almost never”—in the short run. The best recent example is the French Revolution. It got worse with Robespierre—a Bernie Sanders of the era—followed by Napoleon. Or take the case of the Russian revolution. As necessary as it was to get rid of Nicholas II, it got worse with Lenin, and then it got even worse with Stalin. But even in those cases, France and Russia recovered.

If it all comes unglued in the US over the next decade, those two revolutions could be templates. Look at the way leading Democrats think, and listen to what they’re saying. They’re echoing Robespierre and Lenin.

The Republicans aren’t much better, because although they sometimes talk the talk of peace and personal freedom, they almost never walk the walk. The two major US parties—and people in the Red counties and the Blue counties—seem to really hate each other.

It’s quite ugly sociologically. There are irreconcilable differences. They’re exacerbated by the fact we’re headed for a financial blow up. There’s no doubt about that.

Some years ago, there was a poll taken among Generation X types. It turned out that more of them believed that space aliens were going to invade than that they were ever going to collect Social Security. People have very little faith in “the system” anymore, the society, or the government.

If we go back to the beginning of the 20th century, the country really wasn’t very political at all. People worried about their own lives, their own families, and their own local communities. Americans shared a common culture, beliefs, and values—that’s no longer true. Now the country has become very politicized—everybody has a loud voice and they use votes as weapons against their neighbors. It’s become a nation of nasty busybodies.

That makes me think the next upset will be something like a revolution. It’s likely to be really ugly, because we’re looking, simultaneously, at an economic catastrophe, political chaos, and a social and demographic upset—and probably a military situation as well. Government often sees war as a way to unite the country.

So, what’s going to happen?

I’ll hazard a guess that 50 years from now, the United States and, for that matter, most countries are not going to exist in anything like their present form. The best solution is a peaceful break up into smaller political subdivisions. As opposed to a civil war—which is a contest between one or more groups for the control of a central government.

Editor’s Note: Economically, politically, and socially, the United States seems to be headed down a path that’s not only inconsistent with the founding principles of the country but accelerating quickly toward boundless decay.

It’s contributing to a growing wave of misguided socialist ideas.

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Going the Way of the Denarius

Another insightful and prophetic articles from Geoff Thomas highlighting what may be coming down the line regarding digital currencies and of course the endemic failures and corruption of most governments.

Gerard O’Donovan

History repeats. (Or it rhymes, depending on your choice of words.)

Throughout history, there has been an extraordinary tendency for governments (and cultures) to follow similar paths. Even regarding eras thousands of years apart, we see people behaving in much the same way, over and over. This is particularly true in the case of “wrong moves.” Over and over, people and their governments make the same mistakes, seemingly never learning from past errors.

Why should this be? In fact, how is this even possible? Surely, if a government in the 21st century were to make egregiously bad decisions, they are unlikely to be the same bad decisions that were made in, say, Rome, in the 4th century.

The reason, in two simple words, is “human nature.” Human nature remains the same throughout time. Two thousand years ago, governments were typically made up of egotistical, self-centred dictatorial types, who were far more concerned with their own power than in the general welfare of their people. Today, politics remains a magnet for such people. They therefore will revert to type when faced with the very same problems.

Should we cut spending to give the taxpayers a break? No, we should increase taxation and give more to ourselves.

If we spend more than we receive in taxes, should we cut back our expenditures, or should we go into debt? We’ll go into debt, and put the debt on the shoulders of the taxpayers.

If the debt grows to be beyond what can ever be repaid, should we cut back expenditures, or should we allow the economy to collapse? Well, we’re sorry to see the economy collapse, but rather than deny ourselves, get out the fiddle and let Rome burn.

The denarius was the coin of the realm during the centuries when Rome was a republic. Although the gold solidus was used as a storage of wealth, the silver denarius was equal in value to a day’s wages for a common labourer and, as such, was more useful as the primary unit of exchange. During this time, it was a stable currency. However, as Rome turned into an empire, all that conquest in foreign lands became extremely costly and it was decided that one way to offset such costs was to devalue the denarius. Each successive emperor added a bit more base metal than the previous one and, by the time of Diocletian, there was no silver in the coin at all, only bronze.

During this same period, Rome experienced dramatic inflation – a predictable outcome when the coin of the realm is degraded. The population was in decline as well.

If this sounds familiar, it should. Modern governments have a tendency to make precisely the same mistakes with regard to currencies. First, empire-building drains the coffers to the point that maintaining a sound economy is no longer possible, then successive “emperors” make the decision to debase the currency in an effort to keep the party going a bit longer.

Of course, “inflating the problem away” never actually works. Just as Rome went into an irreversible decline, so the empire of today is self-destructing, due, in part, to monetary debasement.

So, is the present-day situation identical to fourth-century Rome? Well, not quite. It’s probably safe to say that, had Diocletian figured out that the coin of the realm could be done away with entirely; that is, had he realised he could replace it with paper notes with his picture on them, he might well have done so. Certainly, modern “emperors” have first created redeemable silver certificates, then subsequently supplanted those certificates with notes that were backed by nothing. (At least Diocletian issued bronze coins, whose value, whilst small, was at least real.)

But the modern-day monetary magician has one more rabbit left to pull out of the hat.

Those who believe that the dollar (as well as the euro and other fiat currencies) is on its last legs are inclined to say, “At least, after the collapse of the dollar, there will be no choice but to return to a gold standard. That will put an end to any inflation, plus put the world back on a solid monetary footing.” But this may be wishful thinking.

The U.S. Federal Reserve remains steadfast in its position that precious metals are a barbarous relic. Certainly, from their point of view, this is true. After all, it’s difficult to fiddle with the value of gold, as it retains its intrinsic value. Two thousand years ago, the purchasing power of an ounce of gold was roughly what it is today. And, whilst the average person may prefer the stability of precious metals, governments have a strong dislike for the limitations that this places on them. Governments prefer to be able to fiddle with the value of currency for their own purposes just as the emperors of old did.

What I believe is most likely to occur as the dollar collapses is that the Federal Reserve will “come to the rescue” with a new currency. Not a paper one, that has obvious problems, but one that “solves all the problems of paper currency.” The new currency may well be more of a credit card – to be used for literally all monetary transactions. And the electronic currency will have an added feature (at least from the point of view of the government). Since it’s electronic, every time the user purchases so much as a candy bar, the purchase is registered in the government data centre. No monetary transaction of any kind can be made, except through the use of the card. (This latter requirement will no doubt be justified as being necessary to control terrorism.)

And the electronic dollar may only be the first of its kind. It should not be surprising if other governments see the benefit of an electronic currency as their sole form of currency and create their own.

So, does this mean that precious metals truly may become the barbarous relic, as governments tell us? Not necessarily. After all, many countries have taken a painful hit as a result of the dollar being the world’s default currency. When the dollar crashes, they will take a further hit. They will not want to recreate that problem by allowing the U.S. to simply begin dealing in a new “ultra-fiat” currency.

Many of the world’s governments are stocking up on yellow metal like never before. It remains to be seen whether they, too, will create their own electronic currencies, whether they will switch to gold-backed currencies, or whether they will attempt a combination of the two.

If, in fact, electronic currency becomes the norm, of one thing we can be sure: The emperors will devalue it, as needed. It will, ultimately, fail and, perhaps sooner, perhaps later, the world will return to the barbarous relic as it has done countless times for the last 5,000 years. The only uncertainty will be when.

Editor’s Note: Wealthy Americans are concerned because the US government is injecting unprecedented amounts of money into the economy.

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Doug Casey Reveals 3 Ways You Can Opt-Out of the Rising Insanity

Another fantastic insight by Doug Casey on the crazy world we live in and the fact that governments are parasitic entities run by psychopaths.

Gerard O’Donovan

International Man: Ever since the outbreak of the Covid hysteria, government control over everyday life has reached unprecedented levels. Petty bureaucrats now exercise control over who can open their businesses, whether you can go to a restaurant, and even whether children can go to school.

Where is this all going?

Doug Casey: There are basically two types of people in the world—people that like to manipulate the physical universe and create things and people who like to manipulate other people and control them. The people who go into government, whether they’re Democrats or Republicans, are the latter. They’re dangerous.

The problem is that the average citizen in every country around the world has come to think that the government is the most important entity in society. It’s not; it’s a coercive fiction, a parasite that produces nothing. The wrong kinds of people are being given even more control.

Once people with a certain psychological mindset—that second type of person I just mentioned—take control, things inevitably get worse.

In Washington, DC, as well as in many state and local governments, we now have genuine Bolsheviks and Jacobins in control. That’s not to say that they’re necessarily believers in those philosophies, but they’re exactly the same psychological types. In other words, they’re exactly the kind of people who once destroyed France and Russia, reincarnated in today’s America.

Once these types get control of the machinery of the State, they won’t give it up. Power—the ability to coerce and control others—is central to their very beings. They’ll try to cement themselves in place now that they feel they can get away with it.

They’ll use their power aggressively, installing counterproductive and destructive policies. The worse things get, the more the public will look to the government to save them. It’s a self-reinforcing feedback loop.

The chances of getting a genuine lunatic as the president are very high. I’m very pessimistic because trends in motion tend to stay in motion—and this trend is accelerating rapidly.

International Man: As a result of this trend, more parents than ever have opted for homeschooling.

What’s your take on this?

Doug Casey: It’s cause for optimism.

First of all, education is something that you provide for yourself. It’s not something that somebody—certainly not the State—gives you.

The value—and the original purpose—of public schooling was basically to teach the three Rs: reading, writing, and arithmetic. With those essentials and the ability to use a library or the Internet, which places all of the world’s knowledge at your fingertips—you don’t need anything else beyond that.

The basics can be picked up in the first six or seven years of grade school—for anybody, even slow learners. Beyond that, school just bores most kids and is actually counterproductive. It not only wastes their time and money but actually makes them dislike learning. Homeschooling allows them to make the world their oyster while teaching individual responsibility.

Secondly, most schooling today—certainly once you get into high school and absolutely once you get into college—is little more than indoctrination. Schools are places where your kids pick up bad ideas from the educators and bad habits from other young yahoos they’re surrounded by.

Schools do not teach critical thinking—if indeed they ever did—at least since Plato’s Academy and Aristotle’s Lyceum. Critical thinking is the habit of questioning all assertions and examining everything that we think we know in the light of knowledge, logic, the scientific method, and your own research. That doesn’t exist anymore in schools. In fact, the government and the establishment don’t want schools to turn out critical thinkers and free thinkers. To the contrary, they want obedient, indoctrinated serfs who will do as they’re told and act as cogs in the wheel.

I think it’s irresponsible on the part of parents not to properly educate their kids. And that doesn’t mean just sending them off eight hours a day where they sit behind a desk and listen to government employees lecture them.

It costs an average of about $12,000 per pupil per year—we’re talking a nine-month year with long vacations—to babysit and corrupt kids. That’s an outrageous amount. College, often over $50,000, can only be described as a scam.

Nobody has more of an interest in making education available to kids than their parents do; certainly not members of the teachers union. If the public schools vanished, it would be a good thing. That $12,000 per pupil could stay in society so that people that wanted to educate their kids properly wouldn’t have to pay the toll twice.

A couple families could easily get together and hire full-time, first-rate tutors to teach their kids one-on-one, as opposed to sending them off to a government factory to be indoctrinated.

The school system has become very corrupt from what it once was. Schools and universities are grossly overweight with grossly overpaid administrators. Ninety percent of these phony “educators” should be fired. Furthermore, most teachers now are overtly Marxist, and the rest are dim, but sympathetic to Marxist ideas. Schoolhouses at all levels should be intellectually cleaned, then fumigated, if they can’t be abolished.

I’m glad many people are dissatisfied with schools and some are doing something about it. It’s one of the few good things to come out of the Covid hysteria.

International Man: What other ways can people opt out and regain more control over their lives?

Doug Casey: The ideal solution is to become a PT—a permanent traveler or prior taxpayer—but that’s not easy for most people. As I mentioned last week, even if you don’t want to internationalize, the next best thing is to quit your job and become self-employed.

But beyond that, in order to have control of your life, you need capital, which gives you flexibility and room to run.

So how do you get that capital?

If you’re not in a position to quit your job and become self-employed, then take a second job— part-time. The advantage of that is your income will go up and your expenses, in the way of consuming, will go down. Put that money aside.

The key is to cut your spending to the bone and save. That means don’t buy that new car or trade up to a larger house. Don’t go out and get a new wardrobe.

Build capital while the economy and the currency are still held together. Capital will allow you to take advantage of opportunities in the future, as opposed to getting deeper in debt like a serf.

International Man: All the governments around the world are inflating away their currencies and taxing their citizens at ever-increasing levels.

How can the average person opt out or at least limit the government’s theft of their savings?

Doug Casey: You want to save, but saving in fiat puts you on a treadmill.

If you leave your money in US dollars or other currencies, you’re going to lose everything or almost everything. You really have to learn to invest and speculate.

Unfortunately, investing in the kind of chaotic, government-controlled economy we’re moving into is hard and becoming harder. On the bright side, the distortions the government is creating offer lots of avenues for speculation. I’ve discussed the differences between saving, investing, speculating, and gambling in the past. But unless you study economics and the markets, if you try to speculate, you’ll probably wind up gambling—which is very different.

The key is to educate yourself on the ins and outs of the markets—including crypto, currency, and commodity markets, not just the stock, bond, and real estate markets.

Right now, commodity markets are particularly interesting. For example, I’m of the opinion that natural gas, which is traded on the futures market, is currently around $5.00 per Mcf. I believe it could go much higher.

I’ve personally sold naked puts to capture the premiums, and I’ve bought long-term bull call spreads. If you’re not familiar with these things, then don’t take my advice. But try to become familiar with these things.

One of the reasons I’m bullish on commodities is that with the Bolsheviks in office in Washington, DC, and actual communists in control of a lot of countries around the world, commodity production of all kinds is being made harder. At the same time, all the money they’re printing is creating artificial demand, and all the regulations they’re passing are artificially restricting supply.

Commodities are about the only cheap things left; their prices are going a lot higher. You can capitalize on this as a speculator if you know what you’re doing. But be careful because you can easily wipe yourself out.

Any savings that you have should be in small gold and silver coins, not in fiat currencies. I don’t see gold as a good speculation at $1800. It is, however, ideal for saving. In addition to providing long-term upside, gold and silver coins are far more private than keeping US dollars in a bank account, which the government can monitor.

Lastly, if you’re going to keep your house and stay in the same place, you might want to save by buying things like cigarettes, whiskey, instant coffee, ammunition, and the like. If times get tough, all of those things are going to be hard to come by. They’ll be in high demand—and they’re an alternative to fiat.

International Man: Today, what we buy, who we interact with, and what we say are more easily tracked.

Everyone’s private information is under assault by a private-public partnership of governments and big corporations.

Where is this all going, and what do you suggest people do about it?

Doug Casey: As much as possible, keep a low electronic profile.

Get off Facebook and other social media platforms. I have a Facebook account, but I never use it or access it in any way for anything personal. It’s strictly a business tool—the same for LinkedIn and the rest of them.

Everybody should realize that social media is the primary way that they track you, learn what you think, and discover who you are. It’s just not good for that information to be in the hands of the bad guys.

Of course, everybody has a cell phone today; they’re tracking devices. Entirely apart from that, the things are a nuisance, and most people are addicted to them. I have one, but I never use it except when I’m traveling or at a conference.

I understand the value of apps for navigating and such. It might be good, however, to have two cell phones. The one you use for talking should be a flip phone. The other can be used selectively for whatever apps you need.

On a personal level, speak up about these things whenever possible. Even though it’s pretty hard to turn back the tidal wave of statism and collectivism that’s washing over society, everyone should do what they can. You might want to start by going to LiveandLetLive.org, run by my friend Marc Victor, for practical thoughts on what you can do. We just taped a videocast that’s pretty good, in my opinion. It will be released shortly.

I’m afraid the US and most advanced countries in the world are well on their way to combining the worst traits of George Orwell’s 1984 with those of Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World.

Editor’s Note: In the months and years ahead the financial, economic, and social conditions will be scary and unpleasant. And it will be very tough to navigate for people who don’t have a grounding in economics and the markets.

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Australia’s astonishing tyranny keeps growing

Another wonderfully worded article by Simon Black highlighting the fact that in many countries we live in the government-controlled dictatorship.

Having a plan B has never been more important.

Gerard O’Donovan

Australia’s astonishing tyranny keeps growing

In the early summer of 1798, an Irish stone mason named Philip Cunningham reached his breaking point.

Cunningham was sick and tired of English rule in Ireland. And along with 50,000 of his fellow Irishmen, Cunningham picked up a weapon and started an uprising against Great Britain.

Their rebellion was a complete disaster; the rebels hoped that the British army was too weak to resist after their defeat in the American Revolution.

But within a few short months the British had regained tight control of Ireland.

Naturally their first order of business was to round up all the remaining rebels— and Cunningham was among them.

His punishment was being shipped off to a British penal colony in the south Pacific, in a place that was generally known at the time as “New Holland”.

Today we call it Australia.

Cunningham wasn’t one to accept his fate easily. Even while en route to Australia, he and other prisoners briefly managed to take over the ship… though British marines eventually regained control and gave Cunningham 100 lashes.

But Cunningham still wasn’t finished. A few years later in March of 1804, he led about 300 Australian prisoners in yet another rebellion against their British jailers.

That rebellion was so severe that the British governor was forced to declare martial law— the first, but certainly not the last time in Australia’s history this would happen.

It’s ironic that, each year, ‘Australia Day’ is celebrated on January 26, which commemorates the day that the British Navy first sailed into Sydney Cove, hoisted their flag, and declared the land their penal colony.

So Australia Day does not celebrate the birth of a nation so much as the ribbon-cutting of a giant prison.

Clearly in 2021, Australia has simply been returning to its roots as the world’s largest prison.

You know the story by now— “two weeks to control the spread” of COVID-19 became “indefinite dictatorship and total suspension of basic human rights.”

Over the course of the last 18 months, Australia’s state and federal governments have:

  • Banned citizens from leaving the country without permission.
  • Banned citizens from entering the country, with threat of five years in prison.
  • Banned citizens and residents from crossing state borders.
  • Banned citizens and residents from traveling further than 5k from home without permission.

Ironically, an Australian government website lays out citizens’ “right to freedom of movement” and says that this very basic human right “cannot be made dependent on establishing a purpose or reason for leaving.”

But Australia doesn’t have to follow its own rules, nor care about the human rights of all the little people, because it’s an emergency.

In the name of COVID Australian police and government officials have also:

It is also now illegal to plan, publicize, or participate in protests.

The right to peaceably assemble and hold public protests against unjust government actions is enshrined in the Western legal tradition. But for organizing protests against the Australian government’s tyranny, Anthony Khallouf has been sentenced to several months in prison.

His “crimes” include not complying with COVID decrees, and “encouraging the commission of crimes”— that is, sharing information about the time and location of protests.

He is a political prisoner, like many of his forebears.

But at least Philip Cunningham was imprisoned because he engaged in actual violence.

Khallouf, on the other hand, was found guilty of… illegally crossing Australian state borders.

That hasn’t stopped the protests however.

Thousands of Australian construction workers, for example, protested because they refuse to be coerced into vaccination against their will.

They actually were peaceful protestors. For real. They literally sang the national anthem.

Yet police pepper sprayed them and fired rubber bullets into the crowd of thousands (which included children).

Perhaps even more diabolical is that the government restricted the media from showing footage of the event as it was happening, and restricted airspace to prevent media helicopters from filming.

That didn’t stop people on the ground from recording it with their phones.

In one exchange, a protestor filmed a police officer agreeing, “I’m just as over this fucking [lockdown] as you are,” but, “we get paid to do this [fire on peaceful protestors] mate…”

I’m just doing my job. I’m just following orders.

Other police were caught on video going door-to-door to ask residents if they planned to attend, or knew of any planned protests.

They asked one homeowner if he is on any social media platforms, but declined to tell him why they targeted that particular address.

What’s really crazy is that this authoritarianism goes beyond COVID hysteria.

Australia’s parliament has passed a new bill eradicating Australians’ right to digital privacy.

It’s called “Surveillance Legislation Amendment (Identify and Disrupt) Bill 2021.”

It gives the Australian Federal Police (AFP) and the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission (ACIC) sweeping new powers to not just surveil Australian citizens online, but also take over and run their online accounts, lock the actual user out of the account, and add or delete data.

The police never have to notify a person that their account has been hacked by the government.

What they are calling “warrants” actually do not always require an actual court or judge to sign off.

An “emergency authorisation,” allows police to bypass the courts entirely. And why should anyone be concerned about that? It’s not like the Australian government has ever abused its emergency powers before…

The right to travel, the right to protest, the right to privacy, the right to due process, the right to leave your home and earn a living— these are basic human rights that are now gone in Australia.

It should be obvious by now to every citizen of any Western nation that never-ending “emergency powers” can easily snowball into a full-blown dictatorship.

There is no reason it couldn’t happen to other formerly free nations as well.

And that means, more than ever before, it’s time to think about a Plan B.

To your freedom,

Simon Black,
Founder, Sovereign Man

Doug Casey’s Top 3 Actionable Tips on How You Can Get Out of Dodge

Another wonderful article from Doug Casey highlighting the dangerous, Draconian and dictatorship world that we currently live in – unfortunately the majority of people don’t even see it. We are beginning the fight of our lives– people need to stand up-

Gerard O’Donovan

Doug Casey's Top 3 Actionable Tips on How You Can Get Out of Dodge

International Man: Almost every government and country in the world is going in the wrong direction from a personal freedom standpoint.

And if the last two years have been an indication, the situation could get much worse before it gets better.

How can individuals limit the impact of government overreach in their day-to-day lives?

Doug Casey: The first thing is to become self-employed. You don’t want a job where you’re dependent on somebody else—or worse, some organization. The bigger the organization, the less relative importance you have, and the more danger you’re in.

Assess your resources and abilities and try to become an entrepreneur. The world has an unlimited desire for goods and services; an entrepreneur figures out how to satisfy them. It takes thought, knowledge, and hard work—but there’s unlimited upside. An employee, by contrast, just does what he’s told for a wage. Most are easily replaceable cubicle dwellers these days. Being an employee is both high risk and low reward.

The second thing you can do is to not support the State in any way. The State is not your friend; it’s your enemy. It takes a fat slice of your earnings and, in return, tells you what you can and can’t do. Find ways to reduce your contact with it and deny it both resources and approval. Minimize the taxes you pay so that you don’t feed the beast.

That includes participating in its elections. Your choice is almost always just the lesser of two evils anyway. Remember that people who want to be in office are desirous of controlling other people. Voters are dupes at best, voting for Tweedledee or Tweedledum while endorsing the corrupt system itself. It’s questionable whether your vote ever does any good—or even counts.

Ultimately, the best solution is the one that Ayn Rand outlined in her novel Atlas Shrugged, which is to put yourself in a position where you can just check out of the system and live in a parallel economy because the old one is going down anyway. Surround yourself with sound, like-minded people to the greatest degree possible.

International Man: Vaccine mandates are threatening millions of people’s livelihoods.

Politicians and companies are threatening people, telling them that either they get the jab or lose their jobs.

What can the average person do to avoid being coerced by such threats?

Doug Casey: You’re right. That’s another reason you don’t want to be reliant on an employer and why you want to be an entrepreneur.

Other than that, you should take opportunities to speak out because most people lack courage and keep their thoughts to themselves. That’s a big mistake. Don’t roll over just because it’s convenient. If you act like a docile sheep or scared rabbit, you’ll get what you deserve.

In the short run, there are ways to avoid the vaccine. For instance, the cities are full of bums on the streets. If you can find somebody who looks like you, lend him your ID, shepherd him to a Walgreens, and have him take the vaccination in your stead to get the paper.

Although I’m sure that’s only a temporary palliative because it would appear they’re going to require people to take booster shots every six months as the virus mutates.

And they’ll probably require some type of bio-identification or the implantation of a chip to ensure that you don’t find some way to get around this, in addition to imposing nasty penalties.

Some people have thought about radical counters to the threats of government and big corporations. For instance, if airlines require that you become vaccinated in order to fly, some who are well-organized might get a hundred friends together to book a flight and show up without vaccine cards. Solutions like that, however, are inconvenient and costly—not just for the airlines. It’s a real problem since we’re moving into a genuine police state.

There will likely be draconian penalties imposed on the 20% of the country that thinks for itself. On the other hand, if there are enough adverse reactions to the vaccine, the hysteria might blow over in six months. I plan on waiting at least another year or two before considering it; I don’t like playing the role of guinea pig—certainly not unnecessarily.

International Man: As the original International Man, you’ve literally written the book on how to protect yourself from your government by diversifying various parts of your life geographically and politically.

How has the current global situation changed your perspective?

Doug Casey: It’s a totally different world now than it was when I wrote the International Man book. That was over forty years ago.

In those days, it was possible to travel on a World Service Authority passport, for instance. Today, that’s completely out of the question. In any event, with international flights down 85% and many countries totally cut off, it’s a totally different world in lots of ways.

Although the days of cheap, carefree travel are over, it’s more important than ever to not be beholden to just one government. You have to get options. Even if you can’t get a second citizenship and a second or third passport, don’t act like a deer in the headlights. It’s important and doable to get official permanent residency in a number of other countries so you have an escape hatch (assuming they allow you to leave).

International Man: Canada, New Zealand, Australia, and other counties in the so-called free world have turned into explicit totalitarian police states. What can the unfortunate people who live behind this new Iron Curtain do to protect themselves?

Doug Casey: As the inmates of the Soviet Union, Nazi Germany, Mao’s China, Pol Pot’s Cambodia, and many other places have found, there’s not much you can do once a place becomes a serious police state. It’s dangerous to do anything.

At this stage, I think non-cooperation is still the best approach. Don’t be complacent and make supplicating motions to the apparatchiks of the State when they require you to do things. Don’t cooperate to the greatest degree possible.

Of course, it’s easy for me to say this as an academic matter, but it’s going to become increasingly dangerous because the society is full of rats that want to turn you in as a potential enemy of the State or a potential terrorist.

In this light, you might want to watch the series, The Man in the High Castle, which gives an alternate history of the US if it had lost WWII. It has lots of interesting discussions and observations about how easily the average American would roll over and cooperate with whoever gives him orders.

I also recommend that everybody rewatch V for Vendetta. It pretty much mimics—at least up to its spectacular climax—what’s going on today, right down to the virus.

International Man: What are some things that people of modest financial means can do now to protect themselves in case the situation persists or worsens?

Doug Casey: In the years to come, a lot of people will find that they have much more modest financial means than they imagined. At some point, the stock market, bond market, and probably the real estate market will crash. In real terms—I don’t know what it’s going to be in dollar terms—it’s going to be a leveling event. Not just despite, but because of the foolish efforts of central banks around the world to prop things up. It’s quite possible that the unwinding has already started with Evergrande in China. Everything else is made in China. Why not the Greater Depression as well?

But apart from staying clear of conventional markets, just try to produce more than you can consume and save the difference. I suggest saving the difference in small gold and silver coins. That keeps it simple.

In addition, speculate on things that are low risk and high potential. Also, don’t have a high correlation with conventional investments.

For instance, one of my favorite classes of securities, uranium stocks, has gone up about four to one in the last few months. Uranium stocks are no longer at the absolute bottom but are going higher. I’m also quite involved in carbon sequestration stocks. Despite the fact that I think the carbon concept ranges from hype to scam, the area will likely get very hot as a consequence of so-called “ESG” investing. I also own a lot of oil and coal stocks, which the market hates. Ironically, they’ll go up at least as much as carbon plays.

But next on the runway will be gold and silver stocks. They’ll not only have their cyclical day in the sun but will also be super hot.

Editor’s Note: Legendary speculator Doug Casey has made millions of dollars over the years finding low-risk investments with potentially huge returns.

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The Triumph of Collectivism

by Jeff Thomas

Another interesting, and thought-provoking article from Geoff Thomas-

That, yet again draws parallels from the past to accurately describe what is happening in the world today— our freedoms are being eroded

and people are acting like sheep

Gerard O’Donovan

 

The French Revolution began in 1789. Maximilien Robespierre was one of its most eager proponents. An extreme left-winger, he sought a totalitarian rule that claimed to be “for the people” (echoing the recently successful American Revolution), but in reality was “for the rulers.” He in turn inspired Karl Marx, author of The Communist Manifesto.

Both Robespierre and Marx had been well-born and well-educated but rather spoiled and, as young adults, found that they had no particular talent or inclination to pay their own way in life through gainful employment. Consequently, they shared a hatred for those who succeeded economically through their own efforts and sought a governmental system that would drain such people of their achievements, to be shared amongst those who had achieved less.

Interestingly, neither one saw himself as a mere equal to the proletariat that they championed. Each saw himself in the role of the one who was to cut up the spoils and make the decisions for the rest of society.

It’s worthy of note that collectivist leaders never see themselves as becoming the humble and patient recipients of whatever bones the government chooses to throw them. They always see themselves in the role of rulers.

Collectivism has remained unchanged in its essence to the present day. It attracts those who would take the productivity of others, enrich themselves, and dole out the remainder to the masses. Seen in this light, collectivism would seem abhorrent. Who in his right mind would wish to lose his freedom, to end up as a member of the lumpenproletariat?

But collectivism has thrived, based on one human emotion—jealousy. Collectivist leaders have learned to sell the people on the enslavement of collectivism by convincing them that those they envy will be brought down—to have their gains taken from them and distributed by the state to those who are less able or less inspired.

Let’s have a look at a few quotes from some of the most noted collectivists and see how their ideas are holding up in today’s world…

“The way to crush the bourgeoisie is to grind them between the millstones of taxation and inflation.” – Vladimir Lenin

“The best way to destroy the capitalist system is to debauch the currency.” – Vladimir Lenin

Both of these principles are moving rapidly ahead in the EU, US, and other “advanced” countries. Taxation in both jurisdictions is already high and leaders plan increases. Inflation is claimed to be necessary, although they claim the present level to be lower than it really is. In fact, it’s unnecessary. It was only a century ago that income tax became institutionalised, robbing people steadily of their wealth without them realizing it, through inflation.

The euro, which gobbled up dozens of independent currencies, is in trouble, and the dollar is nearing the end of its ability to function. They will both soon be destroyed, very much as Comrade Lenin would have wished.

Another primary objective is to dictate what constitutes truth.

Governments have always been known for lying to their constituents, but today, it’s become a fine art. Today, through television, governments are capable of spoon-feeding simplistic dogma and repeating it over and over again, in a way that the three leaders above could never have imagined (but George Orwell most certainly did).

“Give us a child for eight years and it will be a Bolshevik forever.” – Vladimir Lenin

“The secret of freedom lies in educating people, whereas the secret in tyranny is in keeping them ignorant.” – Maximilien Robespierre

All collectivist leaders figure out early on that, whilst education can make a country grow and prosper, it also inspires people to think for themselves, and this must not be allowed to proliferate. Hence the conscious effort to dumb down the proletariat.

In the US in particular, scholastic accomplishment has been steadily and purposely declining since 1965. Although many current US history books no longer teach students about the American founding fathers, they do teach about gender bias, the need for enforced equalization between citizens, and even the significance of Oprah Winfrey. They are no longer history books; they are now books on contemporary culture.

But dumbing down is insufficient. The use of force is often necessary, and that means disarming the populace.

“The only real power comes out of a long rifle.” – Joseph Stalin

“The most foolish mistake we could possibly make would be to allow the subjugated races to possess arms.” – Adolf Hitler

“We don’t let them have ideas. Why would we let them have guns?” – Joseph Stalin

The first quote is from 1924, but an avowed fan of Stalin, Mao Tse-Tung, echoed this principle, saying, “Political power grows out of the barrel of a gun,” in his Problems of War and Strategy in 1938. The quote from Adolf Hitler is from 1942.

Certainly, the EU and the US in particular have been dramatically ramping up their authorities in the weapons department, indicating that they believe doing so will more greatly ensure their power. By going further to disarm their people, as they are also pursuing, they will further ensure that the state becomes all-powerful.

Here are a few miscellaneous quotes to ponder:

“When there is state, there can be no freedom, but when there is freedom there will be no state.” – Vladimir Lenin

“It is enough that the people know there was an election. The people who cast the votes decide nothing. The people who count the votes decide everything.” – Joseph Stalin

“Demoralise the enemy from within by surprise, terror, sabotage, assassination. This is the war of the future.” – Adolf Hitler

The first quote reminds us that, in the eyes of collectivist leaders, freedom and the state are opposites, regardless of what their rhetoric might say. The second quote reminds us that the belief that democracy exists because voting is allowed is a false hope. The third quote warns that the terror in our midst is no accident. Nor is it necessarily due to outside forces. If need be, terrorism can always be created through false-flag events to justify the removal of the rights of the populace.

Political leaders in the former “free” world regularly state that the removal of inalienable rights, the ever-increasing taxation, and the now-perpetual warfare are “making the world safe for democracy.” However, when the democracy is destroyed by these very acts, they are in fact making the world safe for collectivism. As they themselves state:

“The bureaucrat has the world as a mere object of his action.” – Karl Marx

Editor’s Note: The US government is quietly experimenting with a risky economic policy. Some have called it the most dangerous economic idea since communism. We already see the price of almost everything rising quickly.